Venice Will Charge Between Three And 10 Euros To Enter The City

Venice will charge between three and 10 euros to enter the city from the summer of 2022. The price will vary depending on the day and the number of people expected. The city of canals receives 25 million tourists every year …… of which about 14 million are only going to spend the day

The Italian city of Venice has decided to take another step in the fight against tourist saturation and from the summer of next year it will charge its visitors an entrance, according to the Italian media La Repubblica, which ensures that the price will vary depending on the day and the number of people expected.

According to the newspaper La Stampa , the entrance to Venice can cost from three euros to 10 euros (from 3.5 to 11.7 dollars) and will depend on the season and the number of tourists who expect to arrive that day.

The authorities’ forecast is that lathes will be placed at the main access points to the historic center, similar to those that were placed to control the entrances to the city center in 2018.

The adoption of this measure, which had been postponed twice, has finally been approved after the invasion of tourists in recent weeks that resulted in the ban on the entry of large cruise ships . The city of canals receives 25 million tourists every year , of which about 14 million go to spend the day, but do not stay overnight.

In September, the rehearsals: the Venetians will not pay but will have to reserve
In September of this year the payment system will begin to be tested in certain areas of the city, but it will not be until next June 1 when the turnstiles finally come into force based on the tests carried out by the Italian City Council.

The so-called “active management of tourist flows” will be based fundamentally on access through these electronic turnstiles.

You can make a reservation through an application that will allow you to pay the access fee to the city. Venetians will be exempt from payment, although they will be asked to reserve their visit.

The measure, very controversial, is considered by many “an unconstitutional measure and contrary to European legislation”, as stated by Councilor Marco Gasparinetti, for whom something like this “could be done for a limited area, such as St. Mark’s Square, but not for an entire city. ” “It is a measure to make money,” he lamented.

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